1-Sided Dice Now on AwesomeDice.com

1-sided diceWe here at Awesome Dice HQ are thrilled to announce the launch of 1-sided dice. Yes, the fabled d1 is finally here!

Why do you need 1-sided dice?

Imagine this all too common scenario faced every day by D&D DMs around the world: your group is in a dungeon crawl. There’s a room with a pie in it, and the pie is guarded by an orc. If the characters open the door, one of these things happen:

1. The orc attacks

That’s it, there’s only the one option. So the characters do indeed open the door and the poor DM consults the chart. Unfortunately the smallest die type he has is a d4, so our DM has no choice but to roll the d4 over and over until he gets a 1 before he knows what the orc is going to do.

This is exactly the situation that 1-sided dice are designed to solve. Now the DM can grab the d1 and quickly roll just one time, see what the orc will do, and get on with the action of the game. In this way 1-sided dice make your game move faster and better.

Möbius Strip Dice

The 1-sided die is a möbius strip: an object with only one side. If you put your finger on any point of of the die and move it along the surface, you’ll eventually come back to the starting point and will have touched every part of the die (there is not any other side).

1-sided dice are about twice the size of standard gaming dice. Gamers can “roll” the d1 by spinning it like a coin. The numbering comes uninked, and if desired can be easily filled in with a fine-point permanent marker.

The 1-sided dice are available in plastic and as solid stainless steel metal. To be completely frank, the metal d1 is far superior: it has a nice solid heft, looks awesome, and spins delightfully. However, stainless steel is expensive, so we also have a plastic version. It’s the same size and dimensions but it’s very light, lighter even than standard dice despite being much larger.

At Last – Perfect Randomness

These 1-sided dice are the highest precision gaming dice available. The 1-sided dice are guaranteed to have zero deviation from perfect randomness. They are, in effect, statistically perfect. As we saw in our randomness test, even GameScience precision dice don’t roll to casino-level accuracy. But with the d1, you will get the mathematically predicted distribution every time.

Here’s some close-up shots of the 1-sided dice:

1-sided dice
Metal version of the 1-sided dice.
Plastic 1-sided dice
The plastic version of the 1-sided dice.

1-sided dice mobius strip

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21 Responses

  1. A pedantic friend has pointed out that your description: “If you put your finger on any point of of the die and move it along the surface, you’ll eventually come back to the starting point.” is true of a ring too.

    “If you put your finger on any point of of the die and move it along the surface, you’ll eventually come to 1” would be better.

    Looks nifty though!

    1. That is a fair point! I’ve updated the description to note that you will also have passed through every point on the die (unlike the ring, where you’d leave half of it untouched).

    2. You are mistaken. On a ring (such as wedding ring) if you move your finger anywhere without crossing an edge (an area of curvature of radius smaller than what you would call flat) that we use to differentiate one side from another then your finger will only trace either the outside face of the wedding band or the inside face but not both.

      Look carefully at the mobius ring above. ignoring the thin edge which is the thickness of the piece and can be made arbitrarily thin (just like a ring) just to differentiate one side from another, then placing your finger on any large flat portion and moving your finger to all areas that you can reach without crossing an edge you will touch all points on all surfaces; there is only one surface.

      Basically when you use an “edge” to define “inside” and “outside” the wedding ring has two sides, inside and outside. However, the mobius strip has only one side.

    1. Quite late here, but by the way… In Paranoia when a D20 is rolled a low result is a Good thing. So, in theory, Scott would punish his players by deciding to use a smaller and smaller die type until he hits a D1. At which point any enemies attacking the players would always succeed as best they can.

      Also, Paranoia is a game of satire and fun, so this die really does fit in it.

  2. When I need to find out if some certain happens, I’ve always used a marble. Now I won’t have to worry about my 1-sided die rolling away! This is better than a two-headed coin.

  3. Before I used to just throw something at a wall: if it broke then, that was a 1, if it didn’t that meant two things: one, roll again; two, I didn’t throw it hard enough.

  4. For the low, low price of $23.95! What a joke. Way to capitalize on people’s autism. “Checking the charts”? Please.

    1. But if you rolled a blank d6 then you wouldn’t get any result at all, and would have nothing to check against the chart!

  5. You’re not SUPPOSED to roll when there’s only one entry on the chart, that’s the whole point! When there is only one outcome, you KNOW what that outcome is, and it takes away the whole purpose of role playing if you’re gonna break the flow by constantly rolling a dice until it gets to the only number there is. But I strongly suspect that this whole article is a joke, and that I just fell for it….. It’s an amusing concept though, constructing a single sided “die”, I’ll give you that.

  6. Now the DM can grab the d1 and quickly roll just one time, see what the orc will do, and get on with the action of the game. In this way 1-sided dice make your game move faster and better.

    Or the DM could, y’know, just act like a thinking human being and now that they don’t actually have to roll a dice for a one-possibility outcome. Think how much faster/better the game would go when the DM doesn’t engage in pointless actions!

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